Old Bag on a Plane

Bevy of the Month &

Libations from around the world

JULY

JUNE

May

APRIL

MARCH

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

OCTOBER

6 apples

 

3 pears

 

750mL cinnamon whiskey

 

1 bottle Pinot Grigio

 

64 oz apple cider

 

1-liter seltzer water

Chop apples and pears

 

Place them in a bowl and soak for at least an hour

 

Combine liquids in a pouring jug, add fruit

 

Not a Pumpkin Spice Latte, but perhaps even more Autumnal. Enjoy!

NOVEMBER

PUMPKIN SPICE WHITE RUSSIAN

Recipe borrowed from www.thecookierookie.com

FOR THE DRINK

2 shots good quality vodka

2 shots pumpkin spice creamer

1 shot coffee liqueur

FOR THE RIM

1 tsp pumpkin spice

1 tsp sugar

2 tbls crushed graham crackers

I live outside the US and could not find pumpkin creamer. I used single cream and added cinnamon and nutmeg. Mix the drink ingredients and pour over ice. Wet the rim of your glass and dip in crumb mixture. Garnish with whipped cream and spice. 

 

I also attempted a cheat and used Starbucks pumpkin spice latte instead of cream. Worked just as good as was a bit more pumpkin spicey. 

 

Mix up the Russian's, find a fireplace to cozy next to, and enjoy the cold winter nights!

DECEMBER        

Recipe borrowed from BBC Good Food

THE HOT TODDY

Feeling ill. Got the flu? Still want to party? Well then give a Hot Toddy a try. Known also as an Irish Whisky this drink will warm any heart cockle and conquer any common cold. 

50ml whisky

3 tsp honey

1 cinnamon stick, snapped in half

1 lemon, half juiced and half sliced

2 cloves

Whisk the whisky and honey together and split between 2 heatproof glasses. Add half of the cinnamon stick to each, then top up with 200ml boiling water.

Add a splash of lemon juice to each, then taste and add more to your preference. Finish each with a slice of lemon, studded with a clove, and serve immediately.

JUNE

SANGRIA

You can't have summer in Spain without a glistening pitcher of sangria at every meal. Traditionally, sangria is made with red wine but during my last trip to Marbella, I discovered white wine sangria. It is not as flavourful as red, but lighter and easier to drink. It makes for a good alternative: one-night red, next-night white. Cheers!

WHITE WINE SANGRIA

 

25 ounces/750mL white wine (1 bottle)

2/3 cup white sugar.

3 oranges, wedged or 1 cup orange juice)

1 lemon, wedged

1 lime, wedged

2 ounces brandy, if preferred

2 cups/1/2 liter club soda

 

 

 

 JULY

             PROSECCO BELLINI

A fruity prosecco bellini had in the garden as the summer sun sets behind Victorian rooftops. This is summer in Britain.

 

 

 

Ingredients

 

2 containers

raspberries

 

8 oz rhubarb

 

1/2 cup sugar

 

1/2 cup water

 

Chilled prosecco

In a blender or food processor, purée raspberries, rhubarb, sugar, and water until smooth. With a rubber spatula, push the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl.

 To serve, pour 1 to 2 tablespoons of puree into champagne flute and top with prosecco.

AUGUST
IRISH COFFEE
An Odd Choice for August

In 1943, Jim Sheridan was the chef at the Foynes Port restaurant, near the Foynes Airbase in Limerick.  

 

One evening, a flight was returned to the airport due to inclement weather. Sheridan served this concoction to keep the passengers, warm and happy.

His original recipe is: 

creme- rich as an Irish brogue

Coffee-strong as a friendly hand

Sugar- sweet as the tongue of a rogue

Whisky-smooth as the with of the land

For accuracy, try this one.

4 ounces strong coffee

1 1/2 ounce strong Irish whiskey

2 teaspoons brown sugar

1-ounce heavy cream

preheat a glass with hot water.  empty, add brown sugar. as soon as the sugar has melted, add the coffee. stir. add whiskey and stir. after it stills, carefully pour the freshly whipped creme over the back of a spoon. Enjoy!​

About Us

 

Fearing the empty nest? Don't! Since my children have flown the coup, I have had time to refocus on my passions of travel, art, and writing.  This little blog is a handy tool that helps me share what I have learned with others.

 

I grew up in the States, but have lived a large chunk of my adult life in the UK. I now split my time between London and South Africa as well as chasing the sun around the world. 

 

 When my nest emptied, I began to plan my trips according to my own schedule, indulging in going solo. Once one gets used to traveling solo, it can be a very freeing experience. I seek out interesting, informative and unique experiences, and proffer advice with my network of readers.  I also have a lot of fun!

 

 Spa retreats and personal growth travel are core to what I do.  If there was a master's degree in the art of booking massages, I would be a scholarship student! I also plan to conquer Europe one city break at a time and with all that effort, I need as many beach holidays as possible. 

 

So please enjoy reading my tales of travel. I hope you are encouraged to get on that plane and perhaps have a few giggles along the way.

-Beth

When my large family was quite young, we lived in several international postings. In an age before Google Translate,  I negotiated the grocery stores of foreign countries in search of tasty ingredients. I soon became an expert at discerning information from food labels and also learned to cook healthy, quick meals from local sources. 

 

From this experience, I became quite the foodie, even before 'foodie' was a word. And now as an empty-nester and devotee of food travel networks, I  interpret those old recipes into smaller, even tastier versions. 

 

Being an editor and food/wine travel columnist,  I travel the world sampling indigenous recipes which I share on Old Bag on a Plane. I also love wine!

-Phyl

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As we are all not traveling much, now would be a great time to share favourite travel, wellness, and food stories. We would love to include your best tales on this blog. If you would like to collaborate, please email us here at oldbagonaplane@gmail.com